English

Why is the subject important?

Our English curriculum at Trinity Academy Halifax equips all students with the functional skills needed for later life, whilst nurturing a passion and love of literature from across the world. We work as a team to ensure that our curriculum is tailored and differentiated to meet the needs of our cohort to allow each of our students the opportunity to thrive in English and beyond.

Through the study of English Literature, our students develop a knowledge of and embrace cultural capital through a variety of well-considered texts across the English cannon; students are exposed to a range of contextual backgrounds and momentous historical events. These underpin and explore our core values as a school.

Through the study of English Language, we foster the analytical thinking of our students in order to develop their inquisitive natures which will empower them to criticise the things that they read, see and hear in the modern world. It is our aim to ensure that students have a comprehensive vocabulary to access and articulate challenging ideas. We endeavour to teach students a range of oracy and literacy skills which make them effective communicators across a range of modes and mediums.

Year 7

What will I be studying?

  • Cirque du Freak – the Gothic
  • Stone Cold – modern crime fiction
  • The Hound of the Baskervilles – pre-1914 crime fiction
  • Romeo and Juliet – Shakespeare

How will I be assessed?

There are six assessments over the course of the year: three reading assessments and three writing assessments.

  • Assessment 1: Writing assessment – Fiction, linked thematically to the Gothic genre and Darren Shan’s Cirque du Freak.
  • Assessment 2: Reading assessment – Non-fiction, linked thematically to the crime genre and Robert Swindell’s Stone Cold
  • Assessment 3: Reading assessment – Fiction, linked thematically to the crime genre and the novel The Hound of the Baskervilles
  • Assessment 4: Writing assessment – Non-fiction, linked thematically to the Crime genre
  • Assessment 5: Writing assessment – Fiction writing assessment linked thematically to Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet
  • Assessment 6: Reading assessment – Non-fiction reading assessment linked thematically to Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet

Knowledge Organisers

  • Term 1 – Cirque de Freak
  • Term 2 – Stone Cold
  • Term 3– The Hound of the Baskervilles
  • Term 4– The Hound of the Baskervilles
  • Term 5 – Romeo and Juliet
  • Term 6 – Romeo and Juliet

All knowledge organisers are based on knowledge of spelling, punctuation, vocabulary, grammar and text types in relation to the class topics.

Which websites should I use to support my learning?

What will I be studying? 

  • Animal Farm – 20th century political allegory
  • Anthology of short stories and poems – canon, contemporary and culture
  • An Inspector Calls –  a mystery crime drama
  • Literacy for life – persuasive methods & speaking and listening unit

How will I be assessed?

  • Animal Farm – 20th century political allegory
  • Anthology of short stories and poems – canon, contemporary and culture
  • An Inspector Calls –  a mystery crime drama
  • Literacy for life – persuasive methods & speaking and listening unit

How will I be assessed?

There are six assessments over the course of the year: three reading assessments and three writing assessments.

  • Assessment 1: Writing assessment – Non-fiction, linked thematically to civil unrest and George Orwell’s Animal Farm
  • Assessment 2: Reading assessment – Non-fiction, linked thematically to civil unrest and George Orwell’s Animal Farm
  • Assessment 3: Writing assessment – Fiction, linked thematically to the short story collection students have been studying
  • Assessment 4: Reading assessment – Fiction, linked to the poetry genre they have been studying
  • Assessment 5: Writing assessment – Non-fiction, linked thematically to J.B. Priestley’s An Inspector Calls
  • Assessment 6: Reading assessment – Non-fiction, linked thematically to J.B. Priestley’s An Inspector Calls

Knowledge Organisers

  • Term 1 – Animal Farm
  • Term 2 – Animal Farm
  • Term 3 – Short story collection
  • Term 4 – Poetry collection
  • Term 5 – An Inspector Calls
  • Term 6 – Persuasive strategies

All knowledge organisers are based on knowledge of spelling, punctuation, vocabulary, grammar and text types in relation to the class topics.

Which websites should I use to support my learning?

What will I be studying?

  • An Introduction to tragedy, focusing on Shakespeare’s Othello
  • A novel about different cultures (Refugee Boy)
  • Viewpoint writing and non–fiction
  • Power and Conflict poetry

How will I be assessed?

  • Assessment 1: Literature and reading skills – Using an extract from Othello, students will be assessed on their ability to understand an extract and analyse language (1 hour)
  • Assessment 2: Literature and reading skills – Responding to a key theme or character across the whole of a text (Othello) (1 hour)
  • Assessment 3: Literature and reading skills – Using an extract from Refugee Boy, students will be assessed on their ability to understand character (1 hour)
  • Assessment 4: Literature and reading skills – Responding to a key theme or character across the whole of a text (Refugee Boy) (1 hour)
  • Assessment 5: Non-fiction writing skills – expressing a viewpoint and persuading others about the importance of a key global issue in today’s society (1 hour)
  • Assessment 6: Literature skills – Responding to the key themes and ideas within one of the poems studied in preparation for the GCSE content (1 hour)

Knowledge Organisers

  • Term 1 – Introduction to Tragedy and Othello
  • Term 2 – Othello
  • Term 3 – Refugee Boy
  • Term 4 – Refugee Boy
  • Term 5 – Global Issues Non-Fiction
  • Term 6 – Power and Conflict Poetry

All knowledge organisers are based on knowledge of spelling, punctuation, vocabulary, grammar and text types in relation to the class topics.

Which websites should I use to support my learning?

What will I be studying? 

  • AQA English Language Paper 1: Explorations in creative writing and reading
  • AQA English Language Paper 2: Writers’ viewpoints and perspectives

How will I be assessed? 

Paper 1: Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing

Section A: Reading

  • One literature fiction text

Section B: Writing

  • Descriptive or narrative writing

 Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes

80 marks

50% of GCSE

Questions:

Reading (40 marks) (25%) – four questions based on one previously unseen fiction text

Writing (40 marks) (25%) – one extended writing question (24 marks for content, 16 marks for technical accuracy)

 

Paper 2: Writers’ Viewpoints and Perspectives

Section A: Reading

  • One non-fiction text and one literary non-fiction text

Section B: Writing

  • Writing to present a viewpoint

 Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes

80 marks

50% of GCSE

Questions:

Reading (40 marks) (25%) – four questions based on two previously unseen non-fiction texts

Writing (40 marks) (25%) – one extended writing question (24 marks for content, 16 marks for technical accuracy)

Non-examination Assessment: Spoken Language

  • Presenting
  • Responding to questions and feedback
  • Use of Standard English

Which examination board am I following? 

Exam Board: AQA

Specification: 8700

Website: https://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/english/gcse/english-language-8700

Which websites should I use to support my learning? 

What will I be studying?

  • English Literature Paper 1: Shakespeare and the 19th century novel
  • English Literature Paper 2: Modern texts and poetry

Studied Content:

  • Macbeth (Shakespeare)
  • A Christmas Carol (19th century novel)
  • Blood Brothers (Modern text)
  • Power and Conflict Poetry (Poetry)
  • Unseen Poetry (Unseen)

How will I be assessed?

Paper 1: Shakespeare and the 19th-century novel

How it is assessed:

  • written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes
  • 64 marks
  • 40% of GCSE

Questions:

Section A Shakespeare (34 marks): students will answer one question on their play of choice. They will be required to write in detail about an extract from the play and then to write about the play as a whole.

Section B The 19th-century novel (30 marks): students will answer one question on their novel of choice. They will be required to write in detail about an extract from the novel and then to write about the novel as a whole.

Paper 2: Modern texts and poetry

How it is assessed:

  • written exam: 2 hour 15 minutes
  • 96 marks
  • 60% of GCSE

Questions:

Section A Modern texts (34 marks): students will answer one essay question from a choice of two on their studied modern prose or drama text.

Section B Poetry (30 marks): students will answer one comparative question on one named poem printed on the paper and one other poem from their chosen anthology cluster.

Section C Unseen poetry (32 marks): Students will answer one question on one unseen poem and one question comparing this poem with a second unseen poem.

Which examination board am I following?

Exam Board: AQA

Specification: 8702

Website: https://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/english/gcse/english-literature-8702

Which websites should I use to support my learning?

Ofsted Outstanding Provider